Articles Posted in Aerospace/Defense

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Plaintiff, who had endured many hardships in 2003 while trying to leave Baghdad, alleged, in a purported class action, that former officials of the President George W. Bush administration engaged in the war against Iraq in violation of the Alien Tort Statute, 28 U.S.C. 1350. The district court held that plaintiff had not exhausted her administrative remedies as required by the Federal Tort Claims Act. The Ninth Circuit affirmed the dismissal, holding that the individual defendants were entitled to official immunity under the Westfall Act, 28 U.S.C. 2679(d)(1), which accords federal employees immunity from common-law tort claims for acts undertaken in the course of their official duties. The court upheld the Attorney General’s scope certification (determining that the employees were acting within the scope of their employment so that the action was one against the United States). The court rejected an argument that defendants could not be immune under the Westfall Act because plaintiff alleged violations of a jus cogens norm of international law from which no derogation is permitted and which can be modified only by a subsequent norm of general international law. Congress can provide immunity for federal officers for jus cogens violations. View "Saleh v. Bush" on Justia Law

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The Federal Aviation Administration’s former Age 60 Rule required certain air carriers to cease scheduling pilots from operating aircraft when they turned age sixty. The Fair Treatment for Experienced Pilots Act (FTEPA) abrogated the Age 60 Rule and was non-retroactive with two exceptions. Plaintiff, an airline pilot for American Airlines (American), turned age sixty six days before the Age 60 Rule was abrogated. Plaintiff requested to be reinstated in lieu of the FTEPA. American denied the request. Plaintiff then filed a complaint in a federal district court, alleging that he qualified for one of the exceptions to the FTEPA’s non-retroactivity clause. The district court granted American’s motion to dismiss for failure to state a claim. The Ninth Circuit affirmed, holding that Plaintiff did not qualify for an exception to the FTEPA’s non-retroactivity, and therefore, the FTEPA’s abrogation of the Age 60 Rule was inapplicable to Plaintiff and American was immunized from any civil liability. View "Weiland v. American Airlines, Inc." on Justia Law

Posted in: Aerospace/Defense

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After an airplane was damaged in a runway accident, USAU indemnified the owner of the aircraft and brought a subrogation claim against Nabtesco. USAU alleged that the accident resulted from a defective component part, an actuator, manufactured by Nabtesco. The court affirmed the district court's order and held that the eighteen-year statute of repose set forth in the General Aviation Revitalization Act of 1994, 49 U.S.C. 40101, began to run from the date that the component part, along with the aircraft in which it was installed originally, was delivered to its first purchaser. View "United States Aviation Underwriters, Inc. v. Nabtesco Corp., et al" on Justia Law